March 14, 2013

February 27, 2009 Feedsack Friday – Our Checkered Past

The first patent issued for feedsacks made from printed material was issued in 1924. The George Plant Milling Co. of St. Louis sold Gingham Girl Flour in red checked bags. It took a number of years after that until more printed sacks began to appear, but it was a beginning. We know the end result; more than 18,000 different feedsack print patterns!

I imagine that the first red gingham bags looked something like one of these:
gingham feedsackgingham feedsack

We have no way of knowing at this late date, barring any sack that should turn up retaining the Gingham Girl label, whether it was a straight or diagonal check, or the exact scale of the print. Since the first ones, colors have included the entire rainbow and scales have ranged from quite large to tiny. Examples of some of the larger checks:
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack

Here are some in medium scale for you to check out:
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack

We noticed that there seems to be a broader range of color available as the scale gets smaller:
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack
and smaller:
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack

and smaller:
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack
checked feedsack

Up to this point I’ve dealt in plain balanced checks, without additional ornament. Many others I’ll save for a future post, but I want to include a group of checks that are well represented – what I call the trattoria checks, you’ll recognize them if you’ve ever been in an Italian restaurant.
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack
checked feedsackchecked feedsackchecked feedsack

 
 

 

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